Tag Archives: John Coltrane

Episode #52 – Tracey Nicholls Improvising Rage

Anthems are a means by which group identity is formed, and without group identity, argues to Professor Tracey Nicholls, the courage and imagination that justice work requires is in short supply. Today we discuss some of the anthems of the Black Lives Matter movement, such as Black Rage by Lauren Hill and Hell You Talmbout by Janelle Monáe. These anthems use improvisation and the ethics embedded in it to articulate shared values and create social memory. This passionate and jocular discussion weaves together peace studies, decolonization studies, and improvisation theory to offer a platform for reflection on the current social and political climate and how best to channel political emotions such as rage.

This episode originally aired on CFRU 93.3FM in Guelph, Ontario on November 22, 2016.

 

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Episode #38 – Music Ontology with Eric Lewis

This conversation with philosopher Eric Lewis of McGill University centres around the question ‘what is music’, or more specifically, ‘what is improvised music?’ Prof. Lewis explains why a consideration of improvised music can re-frame some of the questions traditionally associated with the philosophical study of music, such as how a musical work is related ontologically to a score or composition, and its associated performances. Lewis discusses his proposal to revive intentionalism in aesthetics, making the, I think, highly appetizing suggestion that we ought to think of improvised music according to the vagaries of the representational visual arts, not via the overblown concepts on offer by traditional music ontology. This episode originally aired on CFRU 93.3FM in Guelph Ontario on April 12, 2016, at 5pm.