Tag Archives: podcast

Episode #56: Kid Koala, Master of Scratch (and stories!), in conversation with Mark V Campbell

You might think that music on a vinyl record is pretty much ‘set in stone,’ that at last we have hit upon a form of music to which improvisation is simply irrelevant. Well it turns out not. Kid Koala is a limitlessly creative scratch DJ from Montréal QC, currently touring his new album Music to Draw To. This episode is a conversation between Kid Koala and Dr. Mark V Campbell, himself a DJ and scholar on DJ culture, from September 2016. They talk about Kid Koala’s origins in classical piano, learning to scratch by sneaking in to his sister’s bedroom, the impossible saga of his first DJ battle, why he learned the blues scale, playing in the band Bullfrog (1994-2004), as well as why he is required to perform in a Koala Bear costume (it’s not by choice). 

This episode originally aired on http://tunein.com/embed/player/s24834/” target=”_blank”>CFRU 93.3FM, Guelph’s campus and community radio station, at 5pm on Tuesday, January 31, 2017.

Episode #7: Writing, Recording and The Ephemeral

Originally airing at 3pm on CFRU 93.3FM on October 23, 2014, this episode considers the relationship between improvisation and composition. I speak with Nick Storring about his tactile composition process on his new album Gardens, musicologist Chris Stover on the value and limits of scores as well as his understanding of Beat Span, and Guleph improviser Ben Grossman reflects on his preference for music that disappears. Hear part of his album Macrophone: Aleatoric Solo Duets for Electro-Acoustic Hurdy Gurdy, as well as Fred Ho’s Sweet Science Suite and Rotary Connection’s Magical World.

Episode #6: Marginal(ized) Music

This episode originally aired on CFRU 93.3FM on October 9th at 3pm. In it: Sean Michaels on Tanya Tegaq, Pamela Dwyer of the Cagibi and Mozart’s Sister on gender in the music industry, James Hale on jazz and John Stetch, Neelamjit Dhillon on his project Komagata Maru, Jeff Bird and Jeff Cairns on musical instruments as the storehouses of traditional music, and much much more.